The goal of this project is to make virtual world a safer and better place without child pornography, major computer crime and RIAA.
Login As
You can log in if you are registered at one of these services:
Security Bulletins
Latest Malware Updates

Infostealer.Posteal

02/26/2015

Downloader.Busadom

02/26/2015

Trojan.Ladocosm

02/26/2015

SONAR.SuspDocRun

02/25/2015

SONAR.SuspHelpRun

02/25/2015

Mozilla Refused Homeland Security Request to Delete an Add-on

Mozilla Refused Homeland Security Request to Delete an Add-on

Mozilla decided to reject a request from the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to remove MAFIAAfire Redirector add-on.

"From time to time, we receive government requests for information, usually market information and occasionally subpoenas. Recently the US Department of Homeland Security contacted Mozilla and requested that we remove the MafiaaFire add-on. The ICE Homeland Security Investigations unit alleged that the add-on circumvented a seizure order DHS had obtained against a number of domain names. Mafiaafire, like several other similar  add-ons already available through AMO, redirects the user from one domain name to another similar to a mail forwarding service.  In this case, Mafiaafire redirects traffic from seized domains to other domains. Here the seized domain names allegedly were used to stream content protected by copyrights of  professional sports franchises and other media concerns", states in the official Mozilla`s blog Harvey Anderson, Vice President Business Affairs and General Counsel at the browser maker.

Anderson explained that Mozilla would "comply with valid court orders, warrants and legal mandates but in this case there was no such court order." Mozilla sent the DHS a set of questions to evaluate the DHS request: asking if any court has determined that MafiaaFire.com or the domains it is redirecting users to are illegal, whether Mozilla is legally obligated to disable the add-on and if the government has communicated its concerns to MAFIAAfire.com directly. "To date we've received no response from Homeland Security nor any court order" says Anderson.

The developer behind MAFIAAfire Redirector told Ars Technica that the DHS has not contacted him and applauded Mozilla for rejecting the DHS request saying "they truly backed up their open source supporting words with actions." The firefox add-on is open source and can also be downloaded from the MAFIAAfire.com web site along with a beta version of a Google Chrome extension.

(c) Naked Security


Security Advisories Database

Remote Code Execution Vulnerability in Microsoft OpenType Font Driver

A remote attacker can execute arbitrary code on the target system.

07/21/2015

SQL Injection Vulnerability in Piwigo

SQL inection vulnerability has been discovered in Piwigo.

02/05/2015

Cross-site Scripting Vulnerability in DotNetNuke

A cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability has been discovered in DotNetNuke.

02/05/2015

Cross-site Scripting Vulnerability in Hitachi Command Suite

A cross-site scripting vulnerability was found in Hitachi Command Suite.

02/02/2015

Denial of service vulnerability in FreeBSD SCTP RE_CONFIG Chunk Handling

An attacker can perform a denial of service attack.

01/30/2015

Denial of service vulnerability in Apache Traffic Server HTTP TRACE Max-Forwards

An attacker can perform a denial of service attack.

01/30/2015

Denial of service vulnerability in MalwareBytes Anti-Exploit "mbae.sys"

An attacker can perform a denial of service attack.

01/30/2015

Denial of service vulnerability in Linux Kernel splice

An attacker can perform a denial of service attack.

01/29/2015

Denial of service vulnerability in Python Pillow Module PNG Text Chunks Decompression

An attacker can perform a denial of service attack.

01/20/2015